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8 Years Ago Today, My Life Changed

Posted on Sep 9, 2017 in Blog |

8 Years Ago Today: The First Appointment I lied on the 22-page “Complete History Form” Dr. Mozayeni asks all patients to fill out. I suspected if I revealed all of the symptoms I had experienced over the years, he would surely think I needed a psychiatrist rather than an LLMD. No one has that many symptoms without being a hypochondriac; even I had to begun to believe this. I focused on my major symptoms and denied the less compelling ones. I was very nervous at my first appointment with Dr. Mozayeni. Partially, because I couldn’t believe I might actually have Lyme Disease. If I did have Lyme, I didn’t want to have Aunt Betty’s outcome. And I didn’t want to have one more physician looking at my paperwork and giving me another incomplete, inaccurate diagnosis. My anxiety had reached a new peak. It wasn’t like getting a splinter in my finger. I couldn’t remember getting the splinter. I couldn’t see the splinter. I couldn’t get a pair of tweezers to excise it. I knew I felt pain and it kept getting worse. But there was no red, swollen, site with puss coming out. There was nothing to show a physician except my own perception and recording of symptoms. Even some of my lab work was faulty, skewing the puzzle more so. For years, I watched and listened as physicians provided little explanation and less treatment for pain that was increasing sometimes exponentially. Over those years, my anxiety increased, my defensiveness grew. I talked with other people, researched the Internet (not necessarily the best idea), desperately seeking answers. When I did receive a diagnosis, I thoroughly researched that condition, becoming as expert as a non-science major can become. But when I met new physicians and explained previous conditions, my knowledge base was met with skepticism and obvious discomfort. I found most physicians did not appreciate being challenged by laypeople. I discovered an ugly dimension in medicine. When the physicians could not come up with a plausible diagnosis or effective treatment, they did not like being put on the spot. They did not care for being challenged with the possibility they...

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Multiple Sclerosis Can Actually be Lyme Disease – Case Study

Posted on May 29, 2017 in Blog |

From Galaxy Diagnostics John (age 53) – Multiple Sclerosis As a small animal veterinarian, John had daily contact with animals for more than 30 years. Starting in late 2004, he suffered numerous progressive neurological symptoms, debilitating enough that after being a runner for years, he faced the possibility of being wheelchair bound. His hands became numb, and he was constantly fighting fatigue. The buildup of symptoms over months prevented him from maintaining his practice and had him seeking medical help. John consulted with numerous physicians and was ultimately diagnosed with Multiple (MS), for which there is no identified cause or cure. Physicians began to administer interferon treatment. The treatment may have helped, but John was still concerned. He knew, as a veterinarian, he had been exposed to numerous pathogens, and the MS diagnosis did not explain all of his symptoms. John tested positive for Bartonella henselae. John was placed on a multi-drug oral antibiotic regime that lasted over a year. Progress was not immediate, but over the course of months, John regained significant use of his legs, had dramatically increased energy and saw a reduction of the neurological symptoms. John’s quality of life improved to the point he was able to increase his work hours. Share...

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Hypotension and Lyme Disease

Posted on May 23, 2017 in Blog |

The following is a case study from Galaxy Diagnostics: Hans (age 20) – Hypotension Hans, a college student in Minnesota, was an active child growing up. He enjoyed hiking, biking, skiing and had pet dogs. He enjoyed a lively social life and was an honor-roll student. In April 2006, the year before high school, Hans began displaying what appeared to be allergies when he broke out in hives and had itchy eyes. However, an allergist was not able to explain the origin of the problem. These symptoms quickly progressed with the development of insomnia and headaches, followed by light sensitivity and short-term memory loss. His parents were very concerned and consulted numerous physicians, including a neurologist, ophthalmologist, and infectious disease doctor. None of these physicians was able to offer a specific diagnosis, instead only treating symptoms. After two years, Hans’ condition worsened. His energy level was so low he was unable to attend high school instead relied on private tutors and home schooling. Because he was unable to take part in the things he had enjoyed growing up, Hans began to develop anxiety and signs of depression. Hans had been tested for seemingly everything. He was diagnosed with hypotension and put on medication for his blood pressure, but the only treatment offering significant relief for his symptoms was acupuncture. Hans found his way to Dr. Mozayeni and started on a long-term antibiotic regimen. At age 20, Hans now enjoys the highest quality of life he has experienced since middle school. He is able to drive and attends college classes. He is able to catch up on the social life he missed out on as a teenager. His energy level, insomnia, headaches, and light sensitivity can still be problematic, but as he continues treatment, he has great optimism. Share...

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What We Need Our Friends and Families to Know

Posted on May 19, 2017 in Blog |

Patients with Lyme Disease or co-infections of Lyme Disease are NOT: lazy, faking, sensationalizing, imagining things; refusing to learn or grow, avoiding responsibility going to grow out of it crazy contagious; it is safe to hug us “just depressed”; if we are depressed, it is because of living with Lyme, not the other way around. Patients with Lyme Disease or co-infections of Lyme Disease ARE: physically ill actually, very ill overwhelmed and frustrated their body cannot work the way they need it to experiencing real pain, often excruciating unique in that we each present with different symptoms; no two patients are the same examples of what can happen to your friend, sister, cousin or boss who has been sick for a long time with no answers; we share our stories so others may find a shorter path to a correct diagnosis Patients with Lyme Disease or co-infections of Lyme Disease DON’T want to hear: You don’t look sick! Are you ever going to heal from this? (Would you ask a cancer patient this question?) But you seemed fine ten minutes ago. But I thought you rested yesterday. Oh good! Now you are better and you can go back to the way you used to live/work! Maybe you should see a psychiatrist. But you looked fine yesterday. I already told you this. Get a grip; there is nothing wrong with you. So what, I get rashes all the time. If this was real, the CDC would do something about it. I know people who have real problems. Are you sure you have a good doctor? When you are going to finally be rid of this thing? What time is dinner? Are you sure you have Lyme Disease? How can anyone have that many symptoms? Do you really need to take all those pills? Isn’t it time you get over this thing? Patients with Lyme Disease or co-infections of Lyme Disease NEED: validation they are truly ill and require treatment help accomplishing the simplest of tasks your love and your physical and emotional support to feel wanted your respect others to know we are not weak hugs loved ones to make...

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We Don’t Have Lyme Disease in Alabama

Posted on May 2, 2017 in Blog |

The only information I knew about Lyme Disease in 2009 was what I had learned during my Aunt Betty’s illness from 2000 until 2002.  My aunt’s story is the worst of all stories: refused a lyme test by her internist, she fought for a year to be diagnosed correctly.  She had the classic tick bite and EM rash, but because of the arrogance and narrow-mindedness of one physician, Betty could not get the test nor the treatment she needed for a full year.  Before being bitten by a tick in her yard, Betty was a vibrant clinical psychologist and tenured professor, teaching psychology courses to master’s level and doctoral candidate students at Auburn University, religiously attending every home football game in her orange and blue. Betty was a “typical” Auburn fan, singing the fight song every week, shouting “War Eagle” when a stronger defense was needed, and crying when the Tigers lost. Betty grew up in Auburn. She earned her undergraduate degree at Auburn. It was home. Teaching at AU was her lifelong dream.  Betty and her husband Troup lived on eight acres on the outskirts of Auburn, Alabama with their horses Sid and Kallie, and their one-eyed goat, Jack. Betty took riding lessons with Kallie on occasion, but mostly, Betty loved nuzzling with her horses and feeding Jack any spare apples she had. She had a good life with a job she loved, a long, happy marriage, a grown son, and a home she and Troup had designed more than a decade earlier. Betty was physically fit, strong, and one of the most attractive women I have ever seen. She could have won any beauty contest with her trim figure, tall stature, and impeccable taste in clothes. Betty was no wallflower.  Her beauty and style brought everyone’s eyes to her as she entered any room.  She felt throughout her life she didn’t necessarily fit in with the crowd, but those around her wanted to fit in with her. She spoke her mind.  She would debate and convince those around her to embrace everyone’s differences and vulnerabilities. In June 2000, Betty went to her internist, complaining of a rash...

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