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Miscellaneous Aids During Treatment

Posted on Dec 5, 2017 in Blog | 0 comments

I am reprinting this chapter from our book, Lyme Savvy: Treatment Insights for Lyme Patients and Practitioners because i think it might help you develop your own Christmas list and your own “how to survive the holiday” ideas . . . Miscellaneous Aids During Treatment Sharon I used to believe when I got sick, I could go to the doctor, get a prescription, take a pill, and I would be healed of whatever ailment had inhabited my body. I used to believe a holistic approach to health and well-being was a nice thought, a possible avenue, but something that mostly appealed to those “hippies” or those with a lot of money to throw around. I used to believe organic food was another way to rip off the customer at the checkout line. And then I got the Lyme Disease diagnosis. Dr. Mozayeni, with his credentials and research strengths, advised me at my second appointment to go “organic.” Some of my blood work came back showing I had significant levels of arsenic in my blood. I completely understand the panic and desperation late stage cancer patients’ experience. I found myself willing to try almost anything to see if it would alleviate my pain and fatigue. I believe in traditional medicine and treatment protocols, but I also now believe a holistic approach is the only way to heal from a systemic, chronic disease. We have gathered a list some patients have found helpful. What worked for some individuals may or may not work for you. And works now may not work six months from now. The point is, if you want to try it, go for it. People are constantly asking me for the “secrets” to healing. There are none. It’s a combination of ingredients unique to each patient. These are items that were simply helpful during the healing process. They are listed alphabetically. Attitude – A positive attitude is a critical element in my recovery. Even when I’m not feeling well, I know it will get better. At the most difficult and fatiguing phase of therapy, I mentioned to Dr. Mozayeni that I was trying to accept “the new normal”...

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Imperfect Holidays

Posted on Nov 23, 2017 in Blog |

Five years ago, Stephen had surgery on his shredded collarbone the day after Thanksgiving. He was miserable that entire holiday. Another Thanksgiving, Joey had strep throat and Jeff stayed home with him instead of joining the rest of the family. We brought leftovers, but . . . One Christmas, a relative’s oven broke and the turkey was not cooked completely – some guests didn’t realize until they had eaten some. On our wedding day, the airlines canceled our flight and we had to rush to the airport to catch another flight. We were in the back of the limo eating our dinner with our fingers b/c the caterer forgot to include utensils. We spent hours in the Tampa airport trying to get to Ft. Myers. The Christmas before Stephen was born, I was on bedrest for ten weeks – I could only get vertical to shower every other day and to use the bathroom. On New Year’s Eve, 2014, Jeff’s dad died at 12:30 in the afternoon. On Good Friday, 2016, Dad died at 5:55 am. Not all holidays have good memories attached to them. Some can develop into funny stories later on (like our wedding day mishap). But some don’t. Sometimes a big family argument breaks out; sometimes you wonder why you are even surrounding yourself with this group of people. It’s all ok. A wise friend said to me, “Lower your expectations; raise your acceptance.” So Stephen was miserable that holiday. He was alive and his collarbone healed (with the help of a few screws and a plate). Joey healed from the strep throat. I can’t bring back our parents, but I can tell funny stories about warm memories I have of them. I can hang ornaments on my tree that remind me of our loved ones. Life goes on and we do the best we can with what we have. Today, I went to a fancy restaurant with a slipper on because I think I tore a tendon in my heel yesterday. I could barely walk. But I went and I had fun. Stephen wore one of Dad’s suit jackets to today’s festivities. In a weird...

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8 Years Ago Today, My Life Changed

Posted on Sep 9, 2017 in Blog |

8 Years Ago Today: The First Appointment I lied on the 22-page “Complete History Form” Dr. Mozayeni asks all patients to fill out. I suspected if I revealed all of the symptoms I had experienced over the years, he would surely think I needed a psychiatrist rather than an LLMD. No one has that many symptoms without being a hypochondriac; even I had to begun to believe this. I focused on my major symptoms and denied the less compelling ones. I was very nervous at my first appointment with Dr. Mozayeni. Partially, because I couldn’t believe I might actually have Lyme Disease. If I did have Lyme, I didn’t want to have Aunt Betty’s outcome. And I didn’t want to have one more physician looking at my paperwork and giving me another incomplete, inaccurate diagnosis. My anxiety had reached a new peak. It wasn’t like getting a splinter in my finger. I couldn’t remember getting the splinter. I couldn’t see the splinter. I couldn’t get a pair of tweezers to excise it. I knew I felt pain and it kept getting worse. But there was no red, swollen, site with puss coming out. There was nothing to show a physician except my own perception and recording of symptoms. Even some of my lab work was faulty, skewing the puzzle more so. For years, I watched and listened as physicians provided little explanation and less treatment for pain that was increasing sometimes exponentially. Over those years, my anxiety increased, my defensiveness grew. I talked with other people, researched the Internet (not necessarily the best idea), desperately seeking answers. When I did receive a diagnosis, I thoroughly researched that condition, becoming as expert as a non-science major can become. But when I met new physicians and explained previous conditions, my knowledge base was met with skepticism and obvious discomfort. I found most physicians did not appreciate being challenged by laypeople. I discovered an ugly dimension in medicine. When the physicians could not come up with a plausible diagnosis or effective treatment, they did not like being put on the spot. They did not care for being challenged with the possibility they...

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One Spouse’s View of Lyme Disease

Posted on May 20, 2017 in Blog |

My husband Jeff wrote an entire chapter in our book Lyme Savvy: Treatment Insights for Lyme Patients and Practitioners. I have included his concluding paragraphs below. It is work, hard, daily work, to support and love a spouse, partner or family member with Lyme and co-infections. But it is vital. Every patient needs and wants to be loved and believed. They are not crazy, or “attention seekers.” They are not making this up. Each and every symptom is real. They are in pain. They are confused. They have very real problems making simple decisions; even the day-to-day decisions are difficult. It is hard to describe the exhaustion because it is so bone and soul deep. The look in the eyes of the infected is deep-set and far away pain and angst ridden. The hurt is deep. Often, the only thing that helps is holding them and reassuring them they are loved and you will be there for them. It is this depth of unconditional love we must wrap them with. Love and care is healing. Share...

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Lyme Savvy is for SALE and AVAILABLE!

Posted on Dec 3, 2016 in Blog |

Lyme Savvy: Treatment Insights for Lyme Patients and Practitioners is NOW FOR SALE! You can order directly from https://www.createspace.com/6177142. Enter the discount code L37GVXBH to receive $4 off the retail price! This is valid only for the month of December! If you pre-ordered a copy, it will arrive in about two weeks’ time. Email me at sharon@sharonrainey.com if you have any questions. I’M SO EXCITED!!!! Lyme Savvy offers important insights into the patient-practitioner dynamic that you need to know to live well while dealing with the disease… and to move toward recovery. In this 624 page volume, rich with information, wisdom and guidance, you will find: • new insights into germs that contribute to chronic illness and small vessel disease; • observations and considerations to help you and your physician rise above the disease process; • stories of patients who have struggled and improved; • important discernments about tests to help diagnose your condition and related contributing factors – tests that many physicians do not currently utilize; • an understanding of the elements of a successful patient-physician working relationship; • therapies that may help relieve pain and suffering; • frank discussions between a Lyme sufferer and her physician, a renowned specialist in the field of Lyme diagnosis and treatment; • powerful, practical suggestions to support you in daily living and improve your quality of life. Lyme Savvy shines a bright light into a world of misinformation, in which sufferers have been stumbling, desperately grasping for help and answers. In these pages, they may finally find what they are hoping for. Share...

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