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Co-infections, Co-infections, Co-infections

Posted on Oct 27, 2017 in Blog |

In the past few weeks, I have talked with several newly diagnosed individuals. Three of them had never heard the word “co-infections.” Thus, they had never heard of Bartonella, Babesia, Erlichiosis . . . and the list goes on. It can be frustrating to educate people about Lyme itself. It can be doubly frustrating to bring them up to speed about the co-infections as well as Lyme. The amount of mis-information about these diseases is overwhelming. I encourage each Lyme patient to find a Lyme Literate Medical Doctor (LLMD) to help you navigate your way to health. And work with your LLMD as a team. One thing that drives me insane: when a patient has an appointment with their LLMD, they develop a new plan for treatment, and then the patient goes on line and asks other patients their opinion of the plan. If you still have questions about your plan, ASK YOUR DOCTOR! Do NOT ask a thousand people who do not have a medical degree, are not familiar with ALL the details of your history and current state. If you feel you can’t work with your LLMD as a team, find a new doctor. I encourage you to read articles from www.whatislyme.com, galaxydx.com, lymeadvise.com, igenex.com, and other Lyme savvy websites. In Lyme Savvy: Treatment Insights for Lyme Patients and Practitioners, we cover many of these co-infections. I encourage you to read it. A note to the new readers: I originally tested positive for Lupus and Lyme. Better testing from Galaxy Diagnostics showed I was positive for Bartonella. I was then treated for Bartonella. And after that treatment, my next Lupus and Lyme tests were negative. It took a smart physician to figure out what I had and how to treat it. Share...

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What We Need Our Friends and Families to Know

Posted on May 19, 2017 in Blog |

Patients with Lyme Disease or co-infections of Lyme Disease are NOT: lazy, faking, sensationalizing, imagining things; refusing to learn or grow, avoiding responsibility going to grow out of it crazy contagious; it is safe to hug us “just depressed”; if we are depressed, it is because of living with Lyme, not the other way around. Patients with Lyme Disease or co-infections of Lyme Disease ARE: physically ill actually, very ill overwhelmed and frustrated their body cannot work the way they need it to experiencing real pain, often excruciating unique in that we each present with different symptoms; no two patients are the same examples of what can happen to your friend, sister, cousin or boss who has been sick for a long time with no answers; we share our stories so others may find a shorter path to a correct diagnosis Patients with Lyme Disease or co-infections of Lyme Disease DON’T want to hear: You don’t look sick! Are you ever going to heal from this? (Would you ask a cancer patient this question?) But you seemed fine ten minutes ago. But I thought you rested yesterday. Oh good! Now you are better and you can go back to the way you used to live/work! Maybe you should see a psychiatrist. But you looked fine yesterday. I already told you this. Get a grip; there is nothing wrong with you. So what, I get rashes all the time. If this was real, the CDC would do something about it. I know people who have real problems. Are you sure you have a good doctor? When you are going to finally be rid of this thing? What time is dinner? Are you sure you have Lyme Disease? How can anyone have that many symptoms? Do you really need to take all those pills? Isn’t it time you get over this thing? Patients with Lyme Disease or co-infections of Lyme Disease NEED: validation they are truly ill and require treatment help accomplishing the simplest of tasks your love and your physical and emotional support to feel wanted your respect others to know we are not weak hugs loved ones to make...

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Disease Transmission to Humans

Posted on May 16, 2017 in Blog |

The following is an excerpt from Lyme Savvy: Treatment Insights for Lyme Patients and Practitioners. We open this section talking about Bartonella, but Lyme disease is also discussed. Keep reading to find out more. Disease Transmission to Humans Dr. Mozayeni There are many ways to get Bartonella, including from your cat. When infected, cats have a million fold higher circulating level of Bartonella. If they are indoor/outdoor cats or feral cats, 80% or more carry Bartonella. The numbers are probably higher but even the sickest cats will have four-to-five days of the month during which they will no detectable Bartonella in their blood. There are many ways to get Bartonella: from fleas, cats, and potentially other biting insects strongly suspected but not strictly proven. So it becomes a much more prevalent infection. The other Protozoa infections probably follow the same pathways in terms of the ways they are spread. Vectors are agents that transmit the various Protozoa that makes people sick. Protozoa get into and on red cells that can be transmitted by mosquitoes, known transmitters of Protozoa. It stands to reason, then, that Babesia and Babesia-like things can be transmitted by mosquitoes. Mosquitoes may be the principle vector. Here we all are worried about deer ticks and most patients with Lyme Disease cannot remember a deer tick bite. But everyone I know can remember a mosquito bite. Everyone I know has probably run into fleas more often than they have run into deer ticks. There are all kinds of fleas. There are sand fleas at the beach. There are fleas on your cat, fleas on your dog. Nine percent of dogs carry Bartonella but when they do, their blood levels are a lot lower so I don’t think they represent as big a reservoir or a risk as cats do. The landscape of chronic infection is far bigger than just Borrelia. This probably explains why patients with these chronic symptoms will all classify their condition as Lyme Disease; it punches their card into a support system. It is a way to describe what they have. But it retards scientific progress because the term is too broad, given the...

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Lyme, Borrelia, Bartonella, Protozoa

Posted on May 14, 2017 in Blog |

The following is an excerpt Dr. Mozayeni wrote from our book Lyme Savvy: Treatment Insights for Lyme Patients and Practitioners I think when Borrelia is present, it tends to be associated with joint pain and sometimes joint swelling because the lining of the joints is very vascular; it is getting its nourishment from the vessels of connective tissue. The lining itself of the joints is the synovium and the synovial tissue is highly vascular. That is why there is a lot of action and a lot of symptoms related to synovial inflammation with all of these chronic infections, Bartonella and Protozoa included. Given this new perspective, the question then becomes: How does this realization shift the diagnostic and therapeutic emphasis? You have to look at Bartonella with the best available test. You have to look at the Protozoa with the best available test, and You have to understand – It is a far stronger form of evidence when you have molecular proof of these infections using these new tests than having a few antibody bands on a Western blot. We need to use molecular tests to succeed more with our therapies. Share...

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Finding a Reputable Lyme Doctor

Posted on May 11, 2017 in Blog |

If you have Lyme disease, you need to be treated by a Lyme Literate Medical Doctor, also known as an LLMD. You can’t just Google them. A good place to start looking is through the ILADS.org website. They can direct you to physicians in your area who have taken courses through their organization. Or even better, look for physicians who have taught the courses. They are the ones who see the most patients, have the most experience with effective treatment, and hold the most wisdom for healing their patients. There are not many LLMDs in the world. You may have to travel a great distance to see a qualified LLMD. Do not cut corners on this aspect of your healing. All LLMDs are NOT created equal. Most LLMDs now require an “application” process. They are literally so overloaded with patient caseloads, that they can pick and choose which patients they will see. While this process may seem absurd from the patient’s point of view, I can tell you now (from the other side), that the physician wants to make this a win/win experience. They want to match up well with each patient to make this a healing experience. If you don’t click with your physician, if you don’t feel you can work as a team, the treatment will not work. So find someone you trust, someone you can align your beliefs with. A few questions you may want to ask your possible physician are: Do you test for co-infections? If so, which labs do you use? How long does your average treatment protocol last? (none of them like this question) What is your philosophy concerning antibiotic treatment? Do you prefer PICC lines or oral antibiotics? Why? Do you treat other conditions such as thyroid and adrenal issues? Or do you focus on only Borrelia and co-infections? How often do you see patients? Some physicians set monthly appointments, others every six weeks. How do I contact the office when I have a problem that cannot wait until the next appointment or if I have an emergency? What is the best way to communicate with office staff and with you between...

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