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Hypotension and Lyme Disease

Posted on May 23, 2017 in Blog |

The following is a case study from Galaxy Diagnostics: Hans (age 20) – Hypotension Hans, a college student in Minnesota, was an active child growing up. He enjoyed hiking, biking, skiing and had pet dogs. He enjoyed a lively social life and was an honor-roll student. In April 2006, the year before high school, Hans began displaying what appeared to be allergies when he broke out in hives and had itchy eyes. However, an allergist was not able to explain the origin of the problem. These symptoms quickly progressed with the development of insomnia and headaches, followed by light sensitivity and short-term memory loss. His parents were very concerned and consulted numerous physicians, including a neurologist, ophthalmologist, and infectious disease doctor. None of these physicians was able to offer a specific diagnosis, instead only treating symptoms. After two years, Hans’ condition worsened. His energy level was so low he was unable to attend high school instead relied on private tutors and home schooling. Because he was unable to take part in the things he had enjoyed growing up, Hans began to develop anxiety and signs of depression. Hans had been tested for seemingly everything. He was diagnosed with hypotension and put on medication for his blood pressure, but the only treatment offering significant relief for his symptoms was acupuncture. Hans found his way to Dr. Mozayeni and started on a long-term antibiotic regimen. At age 20, Hans now enjoys the highest quality of life he has experienced since middle school. He is able to drive and attends college classes. He is able to catch up on the social life he missed out on as a teenager. His energy level, insomnia, headaches, and light sensitivity can still be problematic, but as he continues treatment, he has great optimism. Share...

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Sharon’s Symptom History

Posted on May 17, 2017 in Blog |

The simplest way to present my own history to you is to show you how many different types of physicians I saw, some of the major medical events that occurred, and of course, the various diagnoses I was assigned. I know many patients can probably relate to this snapshot. Physicians I saw for symptoms: Often, I saw more than one each of the following: Cardiologist, Chiropractor, Dentist, Dermatologist, Endocrinologist, Gastroenterologist, Internist, Neurologist, Gynecologist, Neurosurgeon, Ophthalmologist, Optometrist, Oral Surgeon, Orthopedist, Osteopath, Otolaryngologist (ENT), Physical Therapist, Psychologist, Psychiatrist, Rheumatologist, Surgeon, Urologist Sharon’s Symptom History 1981: viral meningitis, unexplained fatigue and exhaustion 1984: diarrhea, abdominal pain, loss of appetite, mouth ulcers, grinding teeth/jaw pain 1988: elevated gastrin levels 1993: depression and anxiety 1995: migraines 1996: h.pylori infection 1999: shattered right foot 2001: recurrent sinus infections, night sweats, hot flashes, dry skin, itchy ears 2002: falling easily, pain in knees and thighs, muscle weakness, sensitivity to sunlight, memory loss 2003: clumsiness, repeated falls, muscle weakness, thigh pain, swollen joints, tooth dies 2004: gallstones, abdominal pain, fatigue, hair loss, noise sensitivity 2005: gastrin level elevated, depression, forgetfulness, trouble focusing, sticky blood 2006: diarrhea, headaches, daytime sleepiness and insomnia, elevated heart rate, word and name search, phasing out of conversations 2008: persistent, dry cough, numbness in hands and feet, chest pains, muscle twitching 2009: back pain, hip pain, occasional blurry vision, incontinence, unexplained rashes, positive Lupus test (positive ANA with speckled pattern) Other General Symptoms Allergies: seasonal allergies, chronic sinus infections Cardiovascular: low blood pressure, perspire easily, dizzy upon standing Constitutional: migraines, weight gain, fatigue, cold extremities, afternoon drowsiness, night sweats, sensitivity to chemicals Ears, Nose, Mouth & Throat: sensitivity to sounds, ringing in the ears, sinusitis, mercury/silver fillings in teeth, mouth ulcers, jaw paint/teeth grinding, dental problems, unexplained face pain Endocrine: heat intolerant, cold intolerant, thyroid disorder, low body temperature
 Eyes & Vision: dry eyes, blurred vision, floating spots, light sensitive, peripheral waves Digestive System: bloating, trouble digesting fats, hemorrhoids, ulcers, irritable bowel, diarrhea, abdominal pain, nausea/upset stomach Genito-Urinary System: incontinences, cramps, heavy flow, PMS, menstrual irregularity, menstrual pain, pelvic pain, health fluctuates with cycles, hot flashes Hematological: Anemia, leg pain with walking Immunological:...

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When It’s Time to Take a Break from Treatment

Posted on Sep 12, 2016 in Blog |

This past week marked my seventh anniversary of seeing Dr. Mozayeni: September 9, 2009 (9/9/09). Some of you may be thinking, “wow, 7 years. That’s a long time to be in treatment. Isn’t she getting better?” Yes, I am. It is important to note here that I was sick for 29 years before getting an accurate diagnosis. Treatment is not going to be a short-term easy fix. I sent him a quick note saying, “My first appointment with you was seven years ago today. Thank you.” He replied, “ Amazing how time flies. Thanks for your trust. We’ve been through a lot. And we have more to do.” I replied, “Honestly, I was thinking of going a six month hiatus, physically and emotionally. Grateful for the safe place to do this work, but I’m tired.” And without missing a beat, he suggested, “ You could come in every three months and focus for now on . . . “ I’m showing you this interaction for a few reasons: 1. It’s important to say THANK YOU to your LLMD. 2. It’s nice to receive a Thank You in return and the validation of the hard work I have put forth as well. 3. It’s important to be HONEST with your LLMD and tell him/her what is going on for you. 4. It’s amazing to have an LLMD who doesn’t skip a beat, who knows treatment fatigue is part of the healing process and suggests some options to you. Sometimes, it is ok to take a break from the forward momentum of active treatment. I have done this at several points in the past 7 years. 1. I published a book, which caused some consternation among some family members. It was a rough patch during which I became almost suicidal. Dr. M managed my emotional status and he backed off my meds a bit. 2. My 16 year-old nephew died by suicide. Suicide wreaks havoc and hell on the entire family, including extended members. It threw me for a loop, most assuredly. It also affected other family members who then dropped into horrible depression. I learned during this time that if...

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Mired in Muck

Posted on May 4, 2016 in Blog |

May 3, 2016 Today, I was going to write another inspiring, hopeful blog about #Lyme disease, encouraging all the patients out there that they too can heal. I have an entire spreadsheet of quotes from Lyme Savvy that I want to write blog postings about to explain why we said what we said. I started a Word file with the first two days of blog postings. And then today happened. I woke up in pain. It was hard to get moving. I went to work and tried to update some software that took two and a half hours and I am still not done because it didn’t install where it said it was installing (and I have a professional who can back me up on that, it wasn’t just me reading something incorrectly). I had two computers and couldn’t use either one because of this damn software malfunction. Then, I left to go to the Lyme doctor’s office. I got some TLC there, but it is emotionally and physically draining. Jeff has been driving me everywhere since Dad died. I’m not a safe driver right now for long distances. The crying from grief attacks me at inopportune moments, like when I am on the road, or in the shower, or on a phone call with a client, or before we go to bed and the house is silent. The phlebotomist fussed at me because I am dehydrated and it took her four sticks to get the iv in. She always gets me on the first try, even when I am dehydrated. Jeff picked up lunch for me so when I got out of the appointment at 2 pm. I am so grateful for this man in my life. I came home instead of going back to work because I was crying too hard from grief about Dad’s death. I came home, turned on my laptop and it told me the Start Up Disk is FULL and it wouldn’t work. I spent three hours lying in bed, clearing files from my computer to try to get it to work. THREE HOURS. I started to write this blog piece, trying to...

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The Duration of Your Illness Does Not Determine Whether or Not You Will Heal

Posted on May 2, 2016 in Blog |

May is Lyme Disease Awareness Month. I will spend this month pulling quotes from our about to be released book Lyme Savvy: Treatment Insights for Lyme Patients and Practitioners. I apologize for the delay in its publication. We had planned to be in print by May 1, but my father’s sudden illness and subsequent death pushed back the production schedule. “It does not appear the duration of your disease determines whether or not you will heal. This is great news for patients who have been ill a long time.” – Dr. B. Robert Mozayeni, Lyme Savvy   When I saw Dr. Mozayeni for the first time in September, 2009, I had been sick for 29 years without reasonable explanation or viable treatment. Having been sick for so long, I almost thought I would never heal. I had seen too many specialists, developed too many rare conditions. I had almost given up hope. After 19 months of treatment, I tested clear for Bartonella in April, 2011 and have tested clear for the five years since. I am still battling Babesia, which at this time is incurable but treatable. This past weekend, I planted herbs and annuals in a small garden. My hands had not touched dirt since 2008 I think because of the vast fatigue these co-infections cause. Healing is happening. I was the typical “List of Symptoms” patient. The simplest way to present my own history to you is to show you how many different types of physicians I saw, some of the major medical events that occurred, and of course, the various diagnoses I was assigned. I know many patients can probably relate to this snapshot. Physicians I saw for symptoms Often, I saw more than one each of the following: Cardiologist, Chiropractor, Dentist, Dermatologist, Endocrinologist, Gastroenterologist, Internist, Neurologist, Gynecologist, Neurosurgeon, Ophthalmologist, Optometrist, Oral Surgeon, Orthopedist, Osteopath, Otolaryngologist (ENT), Physical Therapist, Psychologist, Psychiatrist, Rheumatologist, Surgeon, Urologist Sharon’s Symptom History 1981: viral meningitis, unexplained fatigue and exhaustion 1984: diarrhea, abdominal pain, loss of appetite, mouth ulcers, grinding teeth/jaw pain 1988: elevated gastrin levels 1993: depression and anxiety 1995: migraines 1996: h.pylori infection 1999: shattered right foot...

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