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Co-infections, Co-infections, Co-infections

Posted on Oct 27, 2017 in Blog |

In the past few weeks, I have talked with several newly diagnosed individuals. Three of them had never heard the word “co-infections.” Thus, they had never heard of Bartonella, Babesia, Erlichiosis . . . and the list goes on. It can be frustrating to educate people about Lyme itself. It can be doubly frustrating to bring them up to speed about the co-infections as well as Lyme. The amount of mis-information about these diseases is overwhelming. I encourage each Lyme patient to find a Lyme Literate Medical Doctor (LLMD) to help you navigate your way to health. And work with your LLMD as a team. One thing that drives me insane: when a patient has an appointment with their LLMD, they develop a new plan for treatment, and then the patient goes on line and asks other patients their opinion of the plan. If you still have questions about your plan, ASK YOUR DOCTOR! Do NOT ask a thousand people who do not have a medical degree, are not familiar with ALL the details of your history and current state. If you feel you can’t work with your LLMD as a team, find a new doctor. I encourage you to read articles from www.whatislyme.com, galaxydx.com, lymeadvise.com, igenex.com, and other Lyme savvy websites. In Lyme Savvy: Treatment Insights for Lyme Patients and Practitioners, we cover many of these co-infections. I encourage you to read it. A note to the new readers: I originally tested positive for Lupus and Lyme. Better testing from Galaxy Diagnostics showed I was positive for Bartonella. I was then treated for Bartonella. And after that treatment, my next Lupus and Lyme tests were negative. It took a smart physician to figure out what I had and how to treat it. Share...

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Lyme, Borrelia, Bartonella, Protozoa

Posted on May 14, 2017 in Blog |

The following is an excerpt Dr. Mozayeni wrote from our book Lyme Savvy: Treatment Insights for Lyme Patients and Practitioners I think when Borrelia is present, it tends to be associated with joint pain and sometimes joint swelling because the lining of the joints is very vascular; it is getting its nourishment from the vessels of connective tissue. The lining itself of the joints is the synovium and the synovial tissue is highly vascular. That is why there is a lot of action and a lot of symptoms related to synovial inflammation with all of these chronic infections, Bartonella and Protozoa included. Given this new perspective, the question then becomes: How does this realization shift the diagnostic and therapeutic emphasis? You have to look at Bartonella with the best available test. You have to look at the Protozoa with the best available test, and You have to understand – It is a far stronger form of evidence when you have molecular proof of these infections using these new tests than having a few antibody bands on a Western blot. We need to use molecular tests to succeed more with our therapies. Share...

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Finding a Reputable Lyme Doctor

Posted on May 11, 2017 in Blog |

If you have Lyme disease, you need to be treated by a Lyme Literate Medical Doctor, also known as an LLMD. You can’t just Google them. A good place to start looking is through the ILADS.org website. They can direct you to physicians in your area who have taken courses through their organization. Or even better, look for physicians who have taught the courses. They are the ones who see the most patients, have the most experience with effective treatment, and hold the most wisdom for healing their patients. There are not many LLMDs in the world. You may have to travel a great distance to see a qualified LLMD. Do not cut corners on this aspect of your healing. All LLMDs are NOT created equal. Most LLMDs now require an “application” process. They are literally so overloaded with patient caseloads, that they can pick and choose which patients they will see. While this process may seem absurd from the patient’s point of view, I can tell you now (from the other side), that the physician wants to make this a win/win experience. They want to match up well with each patient to make this a healing experience. If you don’t click with your physician, if you don’t feel you can work as a team, the treatment will not work. So find someone you trust, someone you can align your beliefs with. A few questions you may want to ask your possible physician are: Do you test for co-infections? If so, which labs do you use? How long does your average treatment protocol last? (none of them like this question) What is your philosophy concerning antibiotic treatment? Do you prefer PICC lines or oral antibiotics? Why? Do you treat other conditions such as thyroid and adrenal issues? Or do you focus on only Borrelia and co-infections? How often do you see patients? Some physicians set monthly appointments, others every six weeks. How do I contact the office when I have a problem that cannot wait until the next appointment or if I have an emergency? What is the best way to communicate with office staff and with you between...

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Why Do I talk About Lyme So Much?

Posted on Jul 29, 2015 in Blog |

Why do I talk about Lyme so much? Am I obsessed with it? Do I think everyone I meet could have it? “What is the deal with Sharon and Lyme?” I talk about Lyme because it took me decades to get properly diagnosed and it could have been diagnosed with one test from the right lab. I don’t want others to go through what I went through. I don’t think everyone has it, but I bet 30% of the people I know have at least one DNA band that would test positive for Lyme or a co-infection of Lyme. More importantly . . . I know how easy it is to MISS Lyme Disease. In 2002, in the midst of my symptoms intensifying, my aunt Betty DIED of Lyme Disease. In the midst of her intensifying symptoms, in the midst of her fight to even be tested, I had no idea that my symptoms were similar to hers. Aunt Betty died at the age of 57. Two years before, she was a completely healthy, radiant, psychology professor teaching at Auburn University. A family member, someone I was close to, died of Lyme Disease. . . and I didn’t make the connection. Everything I had kept being explained as something else. So, I never connected it. If I missed Lyme Disease when a family member died of the disease, I worry about everyone else out there who has some of the same symptoms but doesn’t have someone staring them in the face saying, ‘Get Tested for Lyme Disease.’ Imagine my face in front of you. Get tested for Lyme Disease. And when you get tested, demand complete testing from a specialty lab (NOT LabCorp or Quest). Do not settle for just an Elisa test. Do not settle. Sharon’s Symptom History The simplest way to present my own history to you is to show you how many different types of physicians I saw, some of the major medical events that occurred, and of course, the various diagnoses I was assigned. I know many patients can probably relate to this snapshot. Physicians I saw for symptoms Often, I saw more than one...

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Similarities Among Patients

Posted on May 15, 2013 in Blog |

Day 15 – May is Lyme Disease Awareness Month Most Lyme patients aren’t dealing with JUST Lyme disease. Every patient is different, but we have a few similarities. 1. Adrenal fatigue – When I was tested, I found out that my cortisol levels were constantly high; my body was always in the stressed phase. My adrenal functions were high in the evenings instead during the day. This seems to be common among patients. That’s why we tend to have trouble falling asleep. 2. Thyroid dysfunction – My LLMD believes that many of us suffer from Hypo-Thyroidism Type II. It’s a constant battle of regulating my thyroid meds for both T3 and T4. Luckily, he relies more on clinical symptoms than going by blood test results. 3. Fatigue – this seems to be the most common symptom among patients. I think it’s because our entire body is under attack on a daily basis. Our cells spend so much time battling the bacteria that our bodies are literally exhausted to that cellular level. 4. Multiple physical ailments – Borrelia and the co-infections can travel anywhere in the body. They are corkscrew type organisms. They can literally bore through muscle, tissue, bone; anything. For instance, three patients that I know of (including myself) have been told we need major knee surgery. I can’t remember how or why (Lyme brain), but my LLMD explained that the organisms seem to love the joints the most; and thus, create the most damage there. 5. Food allergies – This issue has gained importance over the past few years. Five years ago, finding gluten free foods was difficult at best; gluten free menus were unheard of. We’ve come a long way. Food allergies often cause inflammation in the digestive tract, thus aggravating our already present symptoms. 6. Heavy metal poisoning – when I was first diagnosed, Dr. M tested me for heavy metals as well. My arsenic levels were off the charts. We had our soil tested, water tested, etc. I even received a phone call from the county asking if I had any concerns about where I might be getting the arsenic. Based on a 2006...

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