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I Hope You Learned a Few New Things About Lyme Disease

Posted on May 30, 2017 in Blog |

I hope by now you have learned a few things about Lyme disease that you didn’t know thirty days ago. I hope you carry this information forward in case you find yourself infected or you hear from a friend who has a myriad of mysterious symptoms who can’t seem to get an accurate diagnosis. I am happy to speak with anyone regarding this disease. Please feel free to email me at Sharon@sharonrainey.com. Please consider purchasing our book, Lyme Savvy: Treatment Insights for Lyme Patients and Practitioners. Share...

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Multiple Sclerosis Can Actually be Lyme Disease – Case Study

Posted on May 29, 2017 in Blog |

From Galaxy Diagnostics John (age 53) – Multiple Sclerosis As a small animal veterinarian, John had daily contact with animals for more than 30 years. Starting in late 2004, he suffered numerous progressive neurological symptoms, debilitating enough that after being a runner for years, he faced the possibility of being wheelchair bound. His hands became numb, and he was constantly fighting fatigue. The buildup of symptoms over months prevented him from maintaining his practice and had him seeking medical help. John consulted with numerous physicians and was ultimately diagnosed with Multiple (MS), for which there is no identified cause or cure. Physicians began to administer interferon treatment. The treatment may have helped, but John was still concerned. He knew, as a veterinarian, he had been exposed to numerous pathogens, and the MS diagnosis did not explain all of his symptoms. John tested positive for Bartonella henselae. John was placed on a multi-drug oral antibiotic regime that lasted over a year. Progress was not immediate, but over the course of months, John regained significant use of his legs, had dramatically increased energy and saw a reduction of the neurological symptoms. John’s quality of life improved to the point he was able to increase his work hours. Share...

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Can Bartonella Be a Bigger Issue than Lyme Disease?

Posted on May 26, 2017 in Blog |

The following is an excerpt written by Dr. B. Robert Mozayeni in our book Lyme Savvy: Treatment Insights for Lyme Patients and Practitioners Can Bartonella be One of the Biggest Global HEALTH Problems? Typically, the medical profession has believed that in human mammals Bartonella is only an issue in the immunosuppressed. In our published case series of 296 patients we found evidence of Bartonella in about 62 percent of patients who thought they had chronic Lyme Disease. All mammals can carry Bartonella. It has even been found in whales. Although Bartonella has been found in all mammals, all of the attention has been directed to rats, bats and cats. Many veterinarians and physicians believe Bartonella is a significant global public health microbe. Dr. Edward Breitschwerdt believes that Bartonella is a big global health problem and at this point in time, it is not fully recognized as such. Bartonella could turn out to be an important co-factor in some forms of immune suppression, including HIV and Malaria. Some very recent strains of Bartonella have been found in AIDS patients. Dr. Barbara Koehler at UCSF discovered a strain of Bartonella that was named after her, Bartonella koehlerae, in an AIDS patient. Our group published the first eight cases of Bartonella in immuno-competent patients. There are a lot of people with Bartonella out there who think they have Lyme Disease, so the term Lyme Disease has become way too broad. It has become the term that the popular, in the vernacular, describes everything that is not understood – it is what I call #Lyme Disease. Because that thinking – that logic – lives on the Internet, the definition of Lyme Disease keeps expanding. On the other hand, scientists try to keep their definitions pretty tight so they can have logical discussions and move the science forward. So they come up with a concept, narrowly define it and give it a name so that they can talk about it and then move it forward. With the rise of the self-taught citizen scientists and the availability of information on the Internet, there is no logical process to guide a scientific discourse leading to an...

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Evaluating the Probability for Each Infection including Lyme

Posted on May 24, 2017 in Blog |

The following is an excerpt written by Dr. B. Robert Mozayeni in our book Lyme Savvy: Treatment Insights for Lyme Patients and Practitioners. There are greater risks for Bartonella as a co-infection of Borrelia because you can contract Bartonella also from flea-bites and cats. Fleas and several other vectors are the risk factors for Bartonella transmission Bartonella has been shown to be present in: fleas, dust mites, allergen extracts that are used to treat dust allergies by injection, bed bugs, and most importantly, the common house cat. Especially if the cat is an indoor/outdoor house cat, it is very likely to be carrying Bartonella. The microbe gets into its saliva, the saliva gets onto its fur, its dander and the dander gets into the air. However, currently, there is no evidence to support Bartonella transmission by cats unless the cats are concurrently infested with fleas. When Bartonella bacteremic cats are co-housed with non-bacteremic cats transmission cat to cat does not occur in the absence of fleas. This may or may not be true for dogs – we have no data speaking to this. Current evidence from cats is that the saliva and nails become contaminated with infectious flea feces when the cat has fleas. While no studies have been done that measure the risks, basic facts suggest a cat owner should be very careful to limit how much time the cat is allowed outdoors in order to reduce its risk for flea and tick exposure. Further, a cat or dog owner should be vigilant about controlling fleas. Fleas, including sand fleas, present a high risk for Bartonella infection. We try to blame the flea and the bug rather than the pet. Veterinary medicine has worked to develop some excellent products to prevent flea and tick infestations in cats and dogs, which should prevent bartonellosis in family members. The products should be used year round for the life of the pet. Up to 80% of feral cats may have Bartonella. It may be higher. I have found in patients with Lyme Disease a far greater exposure to cats than to deer ticks. Most cats are completely asymptomatic even when infected...

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Testing for Co-Infections of Lyme Disease

Posted on May 21, 2017 in Blog |

The following is an excerpt written by Dr. B. Robert Mozayeni in our book Lyme Savvy: Treatment Insights for Lyme Patients and Practitioners. When we talk about Borrelia, we must talk about other infections called co-infections. I don’t know if there really is anything “co” about these infections. I think they are called co-infections because as Lyme patients’ symptoms didn’t respond to treatment, people started looking at other infections. So which germs really cause Lyme Disease? Co-infections found in patients include Babesia, Ehrlichia, Anaplasma infection, Bartonella or other proteobacteria, or Mycoplasma. One study done in New Jersey found by PCR, which is not as sensitive as enrichment culture followed by PCR, approximately a third of the ticks carry Borrelia, a third carry Bartonella, 2% carry Ehrlichia and 8% carry Babesia. The positive rate for Bartonella, could have been higher if the study had been done with enrichment culture followed by PCR – a method developed later. Researchers started recognizing the gut of a tick is not a place where the tick only selectively carries Borrelia. Ticks, like other insects, can carry various microbes. However, it is not proven that these microbes are transmitted by ticks; and it is not proven that they are not transmitted by ticks. It should not take a lot of research to determine this. If a tick is feeding off a variety of mammals why wouldn’t the gut of the tick have a whole bunch of different things in it? But it does create some interesting questions. For example, we have never really had a good Bartonella test until recently. How can we be really sure the ECM rash is only from Borrelia? What if the ECM rash is from both Borrelia and Bartonella? That is an interesting potential study. Is there some combination of microbe inoculation that has to occur in order for someone to get sick from a germ? Does it have to be Protozoa plus bacteria? Would the same person get as sick if they had only one of those? These are some of the questions related to these infections. The complexity goes up exponentially because now we have to go further...

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