Posted on May 25, 2017 in Blog |

From Galaxy Diagnostics:
Lauren (age 34) – Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome (POTS)

Lauren was working as an emergency veterinarian in Washington, DC. In 2004, she received a cat bite during an examination. Within a single day, the bite became infected. Lauren was hospitalized and given IV antibiotics. While in the emergency room, she began to feel dizziness and developed blurred vision. Lauren assumed it was from exhaustion but was still feeling symptoms after three or four days.

Lauren was placed on oral antibiotics and returned to work. During the next few weeks, her symptoms worsened. Her vertigo increased and she grew increasingly tired and weak. She was unable to stand for long periods of time and had to stop performing surgery because her vision was too poor. Her increasing dizziness reached the point that she could no longer drive to work. She also started having trouble focusing and had problems with her short-term memory. Within three months, Laura had to stop working completely.

Lauren saw more than 20 physicians including the Mayo Clinic in 2006 where she was diagnosed with fibromyalgia and dysautonomia, specifically POTS (Postural Orthostatic tachycardia Syndrome). POTS is a chronic illness that is characterized by the body’s inability to make the necessary adjustments to counteract gravity when standing up. Patients experience tachycardia (rapid heartbeat), constant headaches, dizziness, weakness and extreme fatigue.

Essentially, this meant that a single movement like standing up could cause her heart to beat so fast she could pass out. Drug treatments were helping, but Lauren was still very disabled. From 2006-2009, she was essentially wheelchair bound and could not leave her house.

In 2009, after three years of POTS treatment and six years of being disabled, Lauren went on antibiotic treatment for over a year and saw slow improvement in her symptoms.

Lauren is now able to drive and go out of the house without assistance. Her energy level is higher and she has regained some independence. She still suffers from blurred vision, some aches and pains, but she is hugely improved today compared to the same point a year ago. She remains optimistic she will be able to resume a normal life. She recently gave birth to her first child and is doing well.