Posted on May 21, 2017 in Blog |

The following is an excerpt written by Dr. B. Robert Mozayeni in our book Lyme Savvy: Treatment Insights for Lyme Patients and Practitioners. When we talk about Borrelia, we must talk about other infections called co-infections. I don’t know if there really is anything “co” about these infections. I think they are called co-infections because as Lyme patients’ symptoms didn’t respond to treatment, people started looking at other infections. So which germs really cause Lyme Disease? Co-infections found in patients include Babesia, Ehrlichia, Anaplasma infection, Bartonella or other proteobacteria, or Mycoplasma. One study done in New Jersey found by PCR, which is not as sensitive as enrichment culture followed by PCR, approximately a third of the ticks carry Borrelia, a third carry Bartonella, 2% carry Ehrlichia and 8% carry Babesia. The positive rate for Bartonella, could have been higher if the study had been done with enrichment culture followed by PCR – a method developed later. Researchers started recognizing the gut of a tick is not a place where the tick only selectively carries Borrelia. Ticks, like other insects, can carry various microbes. However, it is not proven that these microbes are transmitted by ticks; and it is not proven that they are not transmitted by ticks. It should not take a lot of research to determine this. If a tick is feeding off a variety of mammals why wouldn’t the gut of the tick have a whole bunch of different things in it? But it does create some interesting questions. For example, we have never really had a good Bartonella test until recently. How can we be really sure the ECM rash is only from Borrelia? What if the ECM rash is from both Borrelia and Bartonella? That is an interesting potential study. Is there some combination of microbe inoculation that has to occur in order for someone to get sick from a germ? Does it have to be Protozoa plus bacteria? Would the same person get as sick if they had only one of those? These are some of the questions related to these infections. The complexity goes up exponentially because now we have to go further...

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