Posted on May 2, 2017 in Blog |

The only information I knew about Lyme Disease in 2009 was what I had learned during my Aunt Betty’s illness from 2000 until 2002.  My aunt’s story is the worst of all stories: refused a lyme test by her internist, she fought for a year to be diagnosed correctly.  She had the classic tick bite and EM rash, but because of the arrogance and narrow-mindedness of one physician, Betty could not get the test nor the treatment she needed for a full year.  Before being bitten by a tick in her yard, Betty was a vibrant clinical psychologist and tenured professor, teaching psychology courses to master’s level and doctoral candidate students at Auburn University, religiously attending every home football game in her orange and blue. Betty was a “typical” Auburn fan, singing the fight song every week, shouting “War Eagle” when a stronger defense was needed, and crying when the Tigers lost. Betty grew up in Auburn. She earned her undergraduate degree at Auburn. It was home. Teaching at AU was her lifelong dream.  Betty and her husband Troup lived on eight acres on the outskirts of Auburn, Alabama with their horses Sid and Kallie, and their one-eyed goat, Jack. Betty took riding lessons with Kallie on occasion, but mostly, Betty loved nuzzling with her horses and feeding Jack any spare apples she had. She had a good life with a job she loved, a long, happy marriage, a grown son, and a home she and Troup had designed more than a decade earlier. Betty was physically fit, strong, and one of the most attractive women I have ever seen. She could have won any beauty contest with her trim figure, tall stature, and impeccable taste in clothes. Betty was no wallflower.  Her beauty and style brought everyone’s eyes to her as she entered any room.  She felt throughout her life she didn’t necessarily fit in with the crowd, but those around her wanted to fit in with her. She spoke her mind.  She would debate and convince those around her to embrace everyone’s differences and vulnerabilities. In June 2000, Betty went to her internist, complaining of a rash...

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