Posted on May 23, 2014 in Blog |

George “Troup” Brazelton III died suddenly on Thursday, May 1, 2014.  Troup was my uncle. Born on October 26, 1940 in Bessemer Alabama, he graduated from Parrish High School in Selma, Alabama in 1959 and graduated from Auburn University in 1968. Troup was an affable man. He diffused warmth and friendliness with anyone he came into contact with.  He could find a way to connect with anyone, whether he met you in a coffee shop or tailgating at an Auburn University football game.  He could initiate a conversation with anyone, any age, and find something in common within minutes of striking up the conversation.  It was a special talent Troup had that put people at ease- usually making them smile within minutes of meeting him.  He was quick witted and honest. You can tell a lot about a man about how he treats the women around him.  Troup treated his mother and his mother-in-law with great respect, honor, and genuine love.  He took them for drives to see the blooming crepe myrtles and azaleas. He shelled pecans with them. Troup often sat in a chair watching the television – he loved sports and the news shows.  He had opinions and welcomed debate with those that disagreed with him.  He wasn’t a loud or gregarious man; he was quiet in tone.  But he made people laugh.  His statements of the obvious could have been good enough for a stand-up comedy routine sometimes.  But his ability to make others laugh was in a “sneak up behind you and tap you on the shoulder” sort of subtlety. My first soul connection with Troup came in 2000 as he cared for Aunt Betty during her last years of declining health.  What started as a “reaction to suntan lotion” later evolved into a diagnosis of Lupus, to ALS, but was finally found to be Lyme Disease. During Betty’s last 24 months, Troup spent every moment caring for her, researching her symptoms, contacting physicians, doing everything in his power to save her life.  They had found the right diagnosis, and she was getting the right treatment, but it was simply too late.  The Lyme had ravaged too much of her...

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