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Misophonia

Posted on Jan 2, 2014 in Blog |

While sitting idly at the hair salon today, trying to take the grey out of my hair, I was enjoying reading my copy of The Art of Fear. I was delighting in the fact that on January 2nd, I was sticking to my goal of reading for at least a half hour daily. And then SHE sat next to me; old enough to know better, but not giving a rat’s ass. More than 40 years of age, she sat waiting for her grey hair to go blond again, while chomping, smacking her gum. If she spoke as angrily as she chewed her gum, she must be one hell of an angry woman. Not to mention that as a close family relative observes, “a woman chewing gum looks like a cow chewing cud.” And that certainly won’t help you make friends or gain a man’s interest. When I was a teacher, one of my classroom rules was, “If I see it or hear it, it goes in the trashcan.” Actually, I have that rule anywhere I can get away with it. My stepdaughter Heather claims I ruined gum chewing for her for life. Now she can’t stand to see or hear peopIe chew it. Today, I wanted to reach across and yank that damn wad out of her mouth and stick it on her phone that she was just as loudly tapping on. After three angry glares that netted me nothing, I did the only thing I could do: I started playing my solitaire game with the sound turned up 100%. This is the first time I have played an entire game with the sound on. The shuffling of the cards, the dinging that occurs each time a card is played . . . most of the time, it is annoying. For those fifteen minutes, it was delightful. From Wikipedia: Misophonia, literally “hatred of sound”, is a neurological disorder in which negative experiences (anger, flight, hatred, disgust) are triggered by specific sounds. People who have misophonia are most commonly angered, and even enraged, by common ambient sounds, such as other people clipping their nails, brushing teeth, eating crushed ice, eating,...

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15 Books in 2013

Posted on Jan 2, 2014 in Blog |

Usually, I have a pretty good list of books that I have read over the past year, and usually, filled with comments about what I thought about each one. This year, not so much. I was spending a lot of my time WRITING my Lyme Savvy book, so I was doing a lot of research and reading articles, parts of books, etc. Here is my list of the books that I read in their entirety. It is what it is. If you are female and read no other book, please read Carry On, Warrior by Glennon Melton. You will connect. If you are working on your meditation practice (or lack thereof), try Passage Meditation by Eknath Easwaran. If you want a great fiction piece, try Adirondack August by Kay Benedict Sgarlata. I know Kay and I heard part of this book two years ago in a writing workshop with her and I have been anxiously awaiting this book!! When you are reading it, you will think you know. But you won’t know. And then you will know this is a great book! If you went to Randolph-Macon College, or grew up/live in Ashland, VA (or really anywhere in the south), read The Journal Keeper: A Memoir by Phyllis Theroux. If you believe that each body contains energy that is passed between people, that we are all part of one great source, if we are all somehow connected, read The Three Waves of Volunteers and the New Earth by Dolores Cannon. If you have any interest in the effects of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, if you like military related books, read After Action by Dan Sheehan. I know Dan. The book was really good. The last 10% of the book was AMAZING. I wanted to highlight every sentence. If you want to lead a happier life, have a happier marriage, and learn to be a better person, try The Peacegiver: How Christ Offers to Heal Our Hearts and Homes by James Ferrell If you want to read the patient’s point of view about Lyme Disease, try Out Of The Woods: Healing Lyme Disease Body, Mind & Spirit by Katina Makris....

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