Posted on May 3, 2013 in Blog |

Day 3 – May is Lyme Disease Awareness Month

When a general physician tests a patient for Lyme, s/he runs a typical ELISA or Western Blot test. The ELISA or Western Blot also does not test all of the DNA bands for signs of infection. Therefore, it is not a test that Lyme Literate physicians use.

If the Elisa or Western Blot test from a standard lab is the only test your physician is using to decide if you have Lyme or a co-infection, you may want to find a physician more familiar with Lyme.

The ELISA and Western Blot do NOT test for any of the co-infections of Lyme disease. Testing for co-infections requires labwork at specialty labs. If you think you might have one of these, demand that your physician test your blood at a specialty lab. If s/he isn’t familiar with these labs, find a new physician who is familiar with them.

Disclaimer here: I am NOT a physician. I have no medical training and don’t try to even pretend to give medical advice.

I have no affiliation with any of these labs. I just am sharing what I have heard and what I have personally experienced.

Labs that I have heard are ‘state of the art’ include: Stoneybrook, Galaxy Diagnostics, Fry Labs, Igenex.

I believe Igenex was the first lab that tested all the DNA bands for Lyme. Galaxy Diagnostics is the premier lab in the nation for Bartonella testing. They are able to identify 26 strains of Bartonella. When my family was originally going through testing, Galaxy was still finding and identifying new strains. Each time Galaxy found a new one, they went through the previous blood samples and retested them. That’s how they found my husband’s strain. Just four months prior, they couldn’t see it and he tested ‘negative.’ Now he had an explanation for his symptoms. He went through treatment and he has been Bartonella free for two years.

Fry Labs in Arizona has some cutting edge stuff going on. They are the primary lab for testing for and finding the Protomyxzoa Rheumatica.

All of these labs are also very helpful online and over the phone. They also have some published papers on their sites as well that are worth reading.

Remember any of the names of the co-infections? Bartonella, Babesia, Erlichiosis, Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever, Mycoplasma, Qfever, Colorado Tick Fever or Protomyxzoa Rheumatica

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