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Posted on Apr 15, 2013 in Blog |

I had my blog posting already set up for today, but given the tragedy at yesterday’s Boston Marathon, I felt it important to acknowledge the event and to link it albeit in a thin way to Lyme disease. My LLMD has noticed that most of his patients are highly empathic individuals. We are FEELERS. Our intuition is usually very good. We get a “gut” feeling that often turns out to be correct about other people or situations. This can often be very helpful when you don’t have much data to go on in a situation and you are trying to make a decision. However, being highly empathic can also have its drawbacks. In tragedies such as yesterday, highly empathic people tend to collect that trauma and tension into their own bodies and some will even personalize the experience even though they don’t know anyone personally. That creates negative energy that does not help healing. It keeps the patient focused on negative emotions, negative actions. The tragedy is also a stressor. While most healthy people can take the stressor and adjust to it, immune compromised patients cannot always do the same. In fact, many of us can have the bacteria in our body for years, but it doesn’t manifest until a major stressor hits and the body can no longer battle the infection effectively. My Bartonella and Babesia started to surface again after I shattered my foot. I spent 7 weeks in bed with a cast elevated above my heart. That event stressed my body long and hard enough that I could no longer fight the Bartonella and Babesia. Shortly thereafter, my symptoms increased and worsened. Most patients find their Lyme surfacing after a car accident, death of a family member of close friend, another medical health crisis. The stressor doesn’t have to be a bad event either. It can be planning and getting married, graduating from college, buying and moving into a house, going to college, birth of a child. So what do I do to stay well during events such as this? I don’t watch a lot of TV. I don’t keep watching the video footage over and...

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Tragedy and Stress

Posted on Apr 15, 2013 in Blog |

I had my blog posting already set up for today, but given the tragedy at yesterday’s Boston Marathon, I felt it important to acknowledge the event and to link it albeit in a thin way to Lyme disease. My LLMD has noticed that most of his patients are highly empathic individuals.  We are FEELERS.  Our intuition is usually very good.  We get a “gut” feeling that often turns out to be correct about other people or situations.  This can often be very helpful when you don’t have much data to go on in a situation and you are trying to make a decision.  However, being highly empathic can also have its drawbacks. In tragedies such as yesterday, highly empathic people tend to collect that trauma and tension into their own bodies and some will even personalize the experience even though they don’t know anyone personally.  That creates negative energy that does not help healing.  It keeps the patient focused on negative emotions, negative actions. The tragedy is also a stressor.  While most healthy people can take the stressor and adjust to it, immune compromised patients cannot always do the same.  In fact, many of us can have the bacteria in our body for years, but it doesn’t manifest until a major stressor hits and the body can no longer battle the infection effectively. My Bartonella and Babesia started to surface again after I shattered my foot.  I spent 7 weeks in bed with a cast elevated above my heart.  That event stressed my body long and hard enough that I could no longer fight the Bartonella and Babesia.  Shortly thereafter, my symptoms increased and worsened. Most patients find their Lyme surfacing after a car accident, death of a family member of close friend, another medical health crisis. The stressor doesn’t have to be a bad event either.  It can be planning and getting married, graduating from college, buying and moving into a house, going to college, birth of a child. So what do I do to stay well during events such as this? I don’t watch a lot of TV.  I don’t keep watching the video footage over and over. I find some...

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Memory and Energy

Posted on Apr 15, 2013 in Blog |

April 15th – I have accepted The Health Activist Writer’s Month Challenge to write daily about my disease. #HAWMC @wegohealth Memory and Energy For most Lyme patients, memory and energy are two things they wish they had more of. The memory issues are usually short term memory. We just can’t remember things. At a meeting last week, a friend was telling me about a book she liked and she had to tell me the title three times. I still can’t remember it . . .it’s very frustrating for both parties involved. When I go to the store for a few items, if it’s more than two, Jeff knows he needs to text me the list. Yes, the joke is, if it’s three items, I may only bring back one. I know some of you are probably chuckling at this, but it’s a REAL problem for Lyme patients. We also tend to lack our ability for Executive Functioning skills. When I have a flare up, I can’t prioritize my work tasks. I can’t figure out a budget for the month/year. I can’t read and comprehend. The brain literally feels too tired. And the fatigue comes down to the body as well. This isn’t just a ‘I’m so tired, I think I’ll take a nap’ fatigue. This is a fatigue at a CELLULAR LEVEL. This fatigue is so severe that most of us can only lie flat on our beds and stare at the ceiling. Even the TV is too much stimulation and overwhelming to take in. Forget reading a book or knitting. Impossible. And the most frustrating part of this is that we never know when it will hit. Last week, I came home in the middle of the day and slept DEEPLY for two hours, then I went back to work because someone was coming in meet with me. But I knew that if I didn’t go home and rest, I would never have been able to have that meeting. I felt a little better, made the meeting, and then came back home and went back to bed. This past week, my fatigue lasted five days. And I was...

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