Posted on Dec 31, 2010 in Blog |

28 Books in 2010

American Assassin: A Thriller by Vince Flynn
A Mile in My Shoes by Trevor Hudson

Courage of Fear by Barbara Boyer

Dear American Airlines by Jonathan Miles

Game Changer by Elizabeth Puleo
God’s Joyful Surprise by Sue Monk Kidd
Green Smoothie Revolution by Victoria Boutenko

Holly Brown Chronicles by Jes Alexander
How Doctors Think by Jerome Groopman, MD

Lit by Mary Karr
Lyme Disease One Man’s Story by Mike Kasson

Making a Pearl from the Grit of Life by Sharon E. Rainey

Patient Siggy by Sigourney Cheek

Return to Love by Marianne Williamson

Scarlett Nights by Jude Devereaux
Sit, Walk, Stand by Watchman Need
Soul Repair by Jeff VanVonderen

The Age of Miracles by Marianne Williamson
The Anatomy of Hope by Jerome Groopman, MD
The Dark Night of Recovery by Edward Bear
The Fight for Fairfax by Russ Banham
The House of Belonging by David Whyte
The Mermaid Chair by Sue Monk Kidd
The Only Thing Worth Dying For by Eric Blehm
The Secret by Rhonda Byrne
The Shack by Wm. Paul Young

We Are All Welcome Here by Elizabeth Berg
When Things Fall Apart by Pema Chodron

I remember the moment I finished the book, transformed by the experience:
The House of Belonging by David Whyte

Felt validated and reaffirmed when I finished reading it:
Lit by Mary Karr
How Doctors Think by Jerome Groopman, MD
The Anatomy of Hope by Jerome Groopman, MD
Making a Pearl from the Grit of Life by Sharon Rainey (well, duh)

Increased my level of patriotism, made me want to do more than what I do now for our troops:
The Only Thing Worth Dying For by Eric Blehm

Just not my cup of tea:
The Secret by Rhonda Byrne (I developed a resentment about no mention of Christianity in this book)
The Mermaid Chair by Sue Monk Kidd
Dear American Airlines by Jonathan Miles
Patient Siggy by Sigourney Cheek

Another great book by an author I love:
We Are All Welcome Here by Elizabeth Berg
Lit by Mary Karr
American Assassin: A Thriller by Vince Flynn

This author must know me to the core of my soul:
The House of Belonging by David Whyte
The Anatomy of Hope by Jerome Groopman, MD
Lit by Mary Karr
Return to Love by Marianne Williamson
A Mile in My Shoes by Trevor Hudson

Helpful:
Soul Repair by Jeff VanVonderen
When Things Fall Apart by Pema Chodron
The Dark Night of Recovery by Edward Bear
The Shack by Wm. Paul Young
The Age of Miracles by Marianne Williamson
Green Smoothie Revolution by Victoria Boutenko

Entertaining:
American Assassin: A Thriller by Vince Flynn
Holly Brown Chronicles by Jes Alexander
Courage of Fear by Barbara Boyer
God’s Joyful Surprise by Sue Monk Kidd
Scarlett Nights by Jude Devereaux

Unfortunately, I read a few books that I wish I hadn’t spent the money on, but I suppose that’s par for the course. I suggest when you are deciding whether or not to purchase a book, look at the number of pages it has. I paid more than $20 for a few books with fewer than 60 pages. Very irritating. They were not available at the library and they were books I thought would interest or entertain me. Instead, I developed a resentment and am having to ”let go . . . ”

I am glad I have started tracking the books I read. It helps me remember more transformative ‘moments.’

A suggestion:
Kristen McMahon, a fellow bibliophile and friend who introduced me to Nora Roberts and Elizabeth Berg, wrote:
I’ve recorded the books I read for years and this is the system that works the best for me. Get a pack of index cards. Use them as bookmarks. When you start a book write the info on the card — I put title, author, year written and call number if it’s from the library. You can make notes on the card as you read, but I usually wait till I’m done and then write a sentence or two about the book and give it my rating (I rate from a high of 5 to a 1 which means I never finished it). You can either just file the cards in a box or record them in a journal or I have a database of a couple thousand books on my computer now.

And a reminder:
My mother taught me the greatest lesson of all when reading a book . . . if you don’t like what you are reading, put it down and don’t finish it! Reading is for fun, for entertainment. So if you don’t like it, you don’t have to finish it! I still remember the moment Mom told this to me. It has changed my perspective and enhanced my love of reading as a result! And I know it has done the same for others . . . . (ahem, Mary Jo!)

And, of course, if you are looking for a good book to read, you can always purchase a copy of Making a Pearl From the Grit of Life by Sharon Rainey (does that name ring a bell with anyone?) on Amazon and at www.sharonrainey.com. For the record, it’s 144 pages and costs $14.95 plus tax.